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TNI Training Course Schedule: October 2021


The NELAC Institute (TNI) provides an updated schedule each month for upcoming classes and new recorded webcasts. You can expect to receive this schedule the middle of each month.






Click the title of each course to be directed to the course webpage.


WEBINARS:

NEW DATES:

October 26 and 28, 2021

How to Properly and Scientifically Calibrate an Analytical System Instructor: Jack Farrell; Analytical Excellence, Inc.


RESCHEDULED:

October 27, 2021

Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) Testing - Data Interpretation Training Instructors: Theresa Norberg-King, former USEPA; Katie Payne, Nautilus Environmental; Stephen Clark, Pacific EcoRisk; Natalie Love, GEI Consultants


December 7 and 9, 2021

Introduction to Proper and Scientific Integration Techniques for Chromatographic Systems Instructor: Jack Farrell; Analytical Excellence, Inc.


WEBCASTS:


Recorded

Basic Statistics for Environmental Laboratories Instructor: Tony Francis, PhD


Recorded

Brown Bag 11: Contracts and Tenders & Service to Client Requirements and Implementation Ideas Instructor: Mei Beth Shepherd; Shepherd Technical Services


Recorded

Understanding Data, Data Review, and Data Management for Chemical Testing Instructors: Silky and John Labie; ELCAT, LLC


Recorded

Electronic Records Management Instructor: Tony Francis, PhD

Prices are shown for TNI members and Non-TNI members. Group pricing is also available as detailed. You can view course information below or click on the Register Now button for each offering to be directed to the full course and registration page on the TNI website.

WEBINARS


Whole Effluent Toxicity Testing - Data Interpretation Training RESCHEDULED: October 27, 2021 TNI Members: $60 ea.; Group of 5 - 10 students at same location: $275 Non-TNI Members: $75 ea.; Group of 5 - 10 students at same location: $350 Recommended Audience: WET Laboratory Directors, Managers, and staff. WET assessors, regulators, and data users can also benefit from this class.


Summary:

This training is designed to help laboratories, assessors, and regulators gain a better understanding of the tools that are available to them to assist in interpreting the results of their whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests. Environmental Protection Agency’s WET methods are prescriptive for many things, but they do not detail some of the nuances that may occur in WET results. While EPA has published errata and guidance to assist in WET interpretation, various aspects of these updates are not known by all labs. This training will provide information about the various guidance documents and discuss the benefits of using the various guidance documents along with the EPA test method manuals. This training will discuss the 2017 EPA Errata, the 2002 Effluent Toxicity test manuals, the 2000 EPA Method Guidance and Recommendations for Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) Testing, and the 2000 EPA Variability Guidance, along with other EPA WET data interpretation techniques. At the end of this course, laboratories, assessors, and regulators will have a better understanding of the procedures for WET testing along with various ways the data can be analyzed and evaluated. Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the WET test acceptability requirements and testing requirements that must be met

  • Understand the baseline testing conditions that must be verified before data analysis is initiated

  • Understand the different analysis steps that must be completed for failing tests vs. passing tests

  • Understand the difference between point estimates and hypothesis statistical analyses

  • Understand which components of EPA’s Method Guidance and Recommendations currently apply and which do not

  • Understand that concentration-response analysis is required for data interpretation

  • Understand how to assess concentration-response curves based on EPA’s Method Guidance document

  • Understand coefficient of variation and reference toxicant data and how they impact test results

  • Understand how dilution series impacts test results

  • Understand the role PMSD plays in data interpretation when hypothesis testing is required in the permit

  • Understand the role best professional judgement plays in data interpretation

  • Understand the various components of communication at each step of the testing process

View the full course description by clicking on the Register Now button.

REGISTER NOW

Instructor(s):

Natalie Love is the Laboratory Director at GEI Consultants, Inc. with a variety of experience including three years of lab experience previous to GEI, 15 years WET lab experience, macroinvertebrate sorting, WET data analysis, TIE testing, WET data interpretation, NPDES permitting, bioassessments, habitat surveys, analysis of data, and field work. Natalie has extensive experience in the formulation of QA/QC procedures and staff operations for lab facilities. She completed her B.A. in Environmental, Population, and Organismic Biology from the University of Colorado and her M.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Idaho. In addition to her laboratory work, Natalie serves in numerous professional organizations including the Rocky Mountain Water Quality Analysts Association (RMWQAA), The Water Environment Federation, Rocky Mountain Chapter Laboratory Practices Committee, The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Aquatic Toxicity Testing Interest Group, and the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (NELAP) Whole Effluent Toxicity Testing Expert Committee. Natalie holds a Level 3 RMWQAA Certification.


Teresa Norberg-King is a subject matter expert of the development and application of effective methods for identifying significant stressors and effects in aquatic systems where effluent and sediment contamination are of concern. Teresa has been a subject matter expert for The NELAC Institute for several years.


Teresa was formerly with the USEPA Office of Research and Development laboratory where her research interests included chemical testing, mixtures, bioaccumulation, effluent and sediment toxicology, toxicity identification evaluations, toxicity of major ions (TDS) and early life stage fish testing.


Over the course of her career at EPA, she focused on various biological approaches for assessing impacts of chemicals and mixtures of chemicals on aquatic ecosystems. She is one of the two authors that developed the widely used 7-d Ceriodaphnia dubia and 7-d fathead minnow tests, that are now part of the requirements for the NPDES testing program. She also co-authored the toxicity identification evaluations documents and the sediment toxicity testing methods for invertebrates. With her research, Teresa has contributed to major improvements in water quality by working to identify environmental contaminants and developing and validating toxicity tests to predict their effects in the environment. As a national technical expert, she provided assistance to EPA's program offices and regions on fish kills, litigation support for promulgating toxicity test methods, and technical expertise for litigation on illegal discharges. In fact, Teresa was awarded EPA's highest honor, a Gold Medal, for the expert analysis of the toxicity and toxicity identification evaluation for one study. Teresa received her bachelor's degree in biology at the University of Minnesota Duluth and her master's degree from the University of Wyoming while working for USEPA. In her free time, Teresa enjoys camping with her husband, taking walks with her boxer, and most of all being with her family.


Katie Payne is an environmental scientist who has a passion for applying toxicology, biology, and ecology to understand, navigate, and solve complex environmental issues. Katie is the Quality Assurance and Compliance Manager for Nautilus Environmental, an accredited laboratory that specializes in a full range of toxicity testing located in San Diego, CA. With over 10 years of experience in aquatic toxicity, Katie is well versed in conducting routine and specialized freshwater, marine, and sediment toxicity tests utilizing a variety of organisms. In her current role, her focus is production of the highest quality toxicity data through development and implementation of the laboratory QA plan and standard operating procedures. Katie attended the University of San Diego and received a B.A. with dual majors in biology and economics.


Stephen Clark is Vice President at Pacific EcoRisk (PER) an environmental consulting and testing firm established in 1994 and located in of Fairfield, California. Stephen’s 32 years of experience in aquatic toxicology includes serving in the past as Quality Manager and Laboratory Director at PER’s NELAP-accredited laboratory that provides freshwater, estuarine, and marine testing of waters and sediment, bioaccumulation testing in sediments and soils, and chemical product testing. Stephen obtained his B.S. degree in biology from CSU Stanislaus and performed his Ph.D. dissertation research on biomarkers in an estuarine clam in the U.C. Davis Pharmacology and Toxicology graduate group.

How to Properly and Scientifically Calibrate an Analytical System


NEW DATES:

October 26 and 28, 2021

TNI Members: $135 ea.

Non-TNI Members: $150 ea.

No Groups


Recommended Audience: Managers, Supervisors, Analysts, Quality Assurance Staff, Laboratory Auditors and Assessors, Data Validators


Summary:

Proper calibration and calibration verification of analytical systems are critical cornerstones to the generation of accurate and reliable data. Understanding the strengths of calibration options and the limitations of computerized data systems will assure proper calibrations and efficient operational practices. This interactive training series focuses on the critical importance of properly calibrating organic and inorganic analytical systems. A variety of options for calibrating and verifying calibration for instrumental and non-instrumental analytical systems are discussed along with proper practices, documentation practices, and advantages and disadvantages that are associated with different types of calibration curves. Particular attention is given to differentiating between proper and improper calibration procedures so that participants will have a clear understanding of what is acceptable practice and what is not.

This 6–hour training series is divided into two 3-hour sessions and provides practical, comprehensive, and invaluable guidance on understanding the principles of calibration using lecture, discussion, and exercises. One of the objectives and focus of this training is to present material that participants can consider in their daily activities.

View the full course description by clicking on the Register Now button


REGISTER NOW

Instructor(s): Jack Farrell; Analytical Excellence, Inc. (AEX)


Jack Farrell has more than 40 years of experience in the environmental industry as an analyst, QA professional, technical and general manager of small, medium and large commercial laboratories. He is an experienced environmental manager, laboratory chemist, trainer, and auditor. Mr. Farrell holds degrees in Biological Sciences (Microbiology) and Chemistry and is a professional trainer, consultant and third party assessor for a number of state and federal regulators.


Jack Farrell is a Senior Environmental Analyst, President and Founder of Analytical Excellence, Inc. (AEX). Since its inception in 1993, AEX has been an independent strictly confidential consulting firm specializing in environmental laboratory operations, analysis and matters concerning the generation of analytical data to support effective compliance decision-making and aspects of litigation. AEX's clientele consist of well-known small and large laboratory companies, instrument manufacturers, engineering firms, state and federal regulatory agencies and legal practice firms.

Introduction to Proper and Scientific Integration Techniques for Chromatographic Systems Date(s): December 7 and 9, 2021 TNI Members: $180 ea. Non-TNI Members: $195 ea. No Groups Recommended Audience: Managers, Supervisors, Analysts, Quality Assurance Staff, Laboratory Auditors and Assessors, Data Validators


Summary:

The complexity of environmental chromatography, both organic and inorganic, has raised a number of serious issues in the generation of data. One issue that has caused significant difficulty centers on the proper set up of instrument integration parameters and the use of manual integration techniques. In an open letter to environmental laboratories dated September 5, 2002, the EPA-OIG expressed a strong concern regarding the misuse of manual integration techniques to bypass quality control requirements. It has, therefore, become increasingly important for analysts and data reviewers to be well versed in the techniques of quantification and integration of complex chromatographic analyses. Additionally, having a chromatographic system that is properly optimized minimizes the need for manual integration, extra effort, and documentation, and increases productivity.


The two 2-hour webinars will focus on the fundamental issues of automated and manual integration techniques, emphasizing proper technical requirements for sound integration, optimizing chromatography, proper documentation of manual integrations, and problems associated with improper integration techniques. The class will use interactive discussions, presentations, and live data examples with problem solving techniques to demonstrate proper techniques and processes in relation to chromatography, published methods, and meeting the TNI Standard requirements. Chromatographic analysis principles considered in this training include those applicable to GC, GC/MS, HPLC, and ion chromatography. This information and the specific techniques applicable to environmental samples are not generally taught in most secondary schools, by instrument vendors, or in-house. Presentations and discussions will focus on when and how to properly manually correct integrations to assure the integrations are accurate, reproducible, consistent, and representative of the response.


View the full course description by clicking on the Register Now button above.


REGISTER NOW


Instructor(s): Jack Farrell; Analytical Excellence, Inc. (AEX)


Jack Farrell has more than 40 years of experience in the environmental industry as an analyst, QA professional, technical and general manager of small, medium and large commercial laboratories. He is an experienced environmental manager, laboratory chemist, trainer, and auditor. Mr. Farrell holds degrees in Biological Sciences (Microbiology) and Chemistry and is a professional trainer, consultant and third party assessor for a number of state and federal regulators.


Jack Farrell is a Senior Environmental Analyst, President and Founder of Analytical Excellence, Inc. (AEX). Since its inception in 1993, AEX has been an independent strictly confidential consulting firm specializing in environmental laboratory operations, analysis and matters concerning the generation of analytical data to support effective compliance decision-making and aspects of litigation. AEX's clientele consist of well-known small and large laboratory companies, instrument manufacturers, engineering firms, state and federal regulatory agencies and legal practice firms.


WEBCASTS


Basic Statistics for Environmental Laboratories Date: Recorded TNI Members: $165 Non-TNI Members: $180 Recommended Audience: Laboratory management (Laboratory Director/Technical Manager/Quality Assurance Manager), supervisors, and key laboratory staff


Course Description:

This seminar provides an introduction to basic statistical concepts and techniques used for the collection, organization, analysis, and presentation of various types of laboratory data, including how to assess the relationship between two variables and methods for calculation and evaluation of measurement performance indi